Hiking with your dog

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Summer is here so if you’re anything like us at tails.com you and your dog are looking forward to getting out to enjoy long walks or hiking in the countryside. There are a few considerations you need to take into account to make it a safe, enjoyable and fun activity for all involved. Obviously, you both need to build up your endurance levels for regular hiking activities so start slow, gradually increasing the length and difficulty of your routes.

We also need to be responsible dog owners and think about other countryside users, wildlife and farm animals. Here’s our summary of top tips to keep safe during summer walks and hikes:

  • Your dog is required to be on a lead at all times in the countryside between March and July to protect vulnerable ground nesting birds and other wildlife.
  • At other times of the year dogs should either be on a lead or under your control nearby; this is a great reason to get working on your dog’s obedience training, especially recall, to allow them freedom to exercise off lead responsibly and come back when there is a potential hazard.
  • A short lead is advisable around livestock on farmland, as even the most well behaved dogs can worry livestock if free roaming; sheep and lambs in particular are prone to stress from dogs.
  • Make sure your dog’s vaccinations and worming are up to date to prevent risk of disease or transmission to wildlife and farm animals.
  • Always clean up after your dog and dispose of waste responsibly to avoid spoiling natural areas or leaving behind an infection risk to other people and animals.
  • Keep to pathways, be road safe with your dog, close any gates behind you and always take litter home.

In terms of supplies you might need for an enjoyable hiking experience, here’s our list of items you should bring:

  • Collapsible food and water bowls.
  • An adequate supply of food; your dog may need extra calories in larger meals for long hikes. Be sure to allow at least an hour for your dog to rest and digest each meal after eating.
  • Clean water. Your dog may pick up infections and certain parasites if drinking from contaminated or soiled outdoor water sources so it’s best to have a clean supply to offer regularly.
  • Basic first aid kit; your local vet clinic or dog training clubs may host local first aid courses. Antiseptic for small grazes or cuts, a tick remover tool and basic bandaging materials are excellent items to include.
  • Dog backpacks are available online and allow your dog to carry their own supplies; take care to get them used to this and build up the level gradually without overloading them.

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One comment

  1. Our two boys started their new tails.com food last week and they are loving it. You can even see the difference in their coats, their toileting, etc. Absolutely made up for them with their new, high quality food. Tailor made to them, as Rambo, our Rottweiler x English bull mastiff is a very fussy 19 month old, where as, Inkerman, our 15 week old Rottweiler x English bull mastiff isn’t that bothered as long as it tastes good. Ha ha! Very happy boys.

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