Why do dogs sigh?

Picture the scene – you’re staring out of your window at a world full of opportunity that has been sunny and bright all week, but now it’s bathed in dark clouds and rain. The temperature has dropped, and despite wanting to take your dog for a big hike all week, it appears the moment has passed. As you stare longingly into the wild world beyond, you sigh. And then your dog sighs too. Is your dog sighing for the same reason as you? Or is it something else? Let’s find out why dogs sigh.

A sigh of the times

While we tend to sigh out of exasperation or boredom, it appears as if a dog sighs as a way to indicate that a time, event, or occasion has come to a close, This isn’t a sad thing by any means – that event might have been a run in their favourite spot, or that occasion might have been having a lovely time gambolling with their friends in the park. What animal psychologists have been able to determine is that, often, a sigh from a dog actually shows contentment and happiness. It’s their way of saying “well, that was fun”. 

If they’ve got their peepers closed as well, a sigh can also be a sign of great pleasure and happiness. Imagine you’ve had a great night out, had some nice food and drinks, seen all your friends and gotten home safely with a mind full of lovely memories. You lean back against the front door once you’re inside, close your eyes, and sigh a sigh of contentment -that’s what your dog is doing there.

So if you are staring out at a rainy sky with your plans of adventure dashed by the weather, as you and your dog sigh together, know that your dog is happy, because it gets to spend all day inside with their favourite human.

And if you want to make your dog even happier, pick out some delicious dog treats to brighten their world a little more.

5 thoughts on “Why do dogs sigh?”

  1. Just a question please.i have ordered with u for the 1st time.wet and dry food.can I mix the 2 together.as hiccups main meal.

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  2. Hey Tails

    Just love your product. All our dogs have become super energised, sleep less and have lost weight. And so thank you for that.

    Anyway, I have always appreciated your supportive blogs. This one was of particular interest to my family because our beautiful German Pointer girl often sighs, huffs and flounces at us. It’s really funny.

    Yes, we can definitely hear the pleasurable sighs she gives us, when we stroke her while she sleeps, and when we give her special attention to show her that we love her every day (probably hourly if we’re honest). But there are some clear definite sighs, especially since the pandemic and working at home, that she’s telling us she’s totally fed up with us looking at screens, e.g laptops, phones etc. As far as she’s concerned it’s wasted time and we should be out walking. She doesn’t realise it keeps her in dog biscuits!

    I suppose, what I wanted to say is that there can be a great variation in why they’re sighing (or perhaps huffing) about. We know we’ve raised a diva without doubt and perhaps it’s just us.

    Anyway, thank you once again for your informative articles and wonderful quality food.

    Claire, Richard, Gwen & Bruce

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    • Your diva sounds exactly like our two drama queens! Any nanosecond not spent with us tending to their every whim is a nanosecond not worth living (according to them!)…🤣

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  3. Maybe a little too much anthropomorphism here… more often than not a good strong sigh would just be a way to purge out the lungs as the muscles relax.

    However there are recent studies that show our pooches are certainly capable of human-like emotion, and even develop a genuine love-connection with their human parents, as proven with measures of oxytocin.

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